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Title: Delivery practices of traditional birth attendants in Dhaka slums, Bangladesh.
Authors: Fronczak, N.
Arifeen, S.E.
Moran, A.C.
Caulfield, L.E.
Baqui, A.H.
Keywords: Maternal Mortality
Medicine, Traditional
Infant Mortality
Prospective Studies
Risk Factors
Rural Population
Midwifery-methods
Pregnancy
Female
Obstetric Labor Complications-epidemiology
Bangladesh-epidemiology
Issue Date: Dec-2007
Citation: J Health Popul Nutr 2007 Dec;25(4):479-87
Abstract: This paper describes associations among delivery-location, training of birth attendants, birthing practices, and early postpartum morbidity in women in slum areas of Dhaka, Bangladesh. During November 1993-May 1995, data on delivery-location, training of birth attendants, birthing practices, delivery-related complications, and postpartum morbidity were collected through interviews with 1,506 women, 489 home-based birth attendants, and audits in 20 facilities where the women from this study gave birth. Associations among maternal characteristics, birth practices, delivery-location, and early postpartum morbidity were specifically explored. Self-reported postpartum morbidity was associated with maternal characteristics, delivery-related complications, and some birthing practices. Dais with more experience were more likely to use potentially-harmful birthing practices which increased the risk of postpartum morbidity among women with births at home. Postpartum morbidity did not differ by birth-location. Safe motherhood programmes must develop effective strategies to discourage potentially-harmful home-based delivery practices demonstrated to contribute to morbidity
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/123456789/2983
Appears in Collections:Health and family planning systems research papers

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